Florida Greyhound Deaths Continue to Place Black Mark on Gambling Racing Industry

Casino Watch Focus has reported on the many issues the dog racing industry faces in Florida. Its an industry on the verge of collapse and the treatment of the animals has been more than a sore spot. After a series of reports surfaced outlining the death of dogs and other mismanagement, the industry came under fire and the hope was the pressure would improve the situation. After the Greyhound Protection Act passed in Seminole County, the rule requiring reporting of injuries and other industry regulations has been pushed as a statewide measure through an Initiative Petition. Florida already requires the reporting of deaths of dogs, and those numbers continue to climb despite the widespread negative press the industry is receiving. An online source reports: 

A racing greyhound named F.F. Maverick had just sprinted out of the starting gate at the Daytona Beach Kennel Club and was about to make the first turn when the 2-year-old dog bumped into two other greyhounds. Video posted on the racing website raceinfo.com on September 28th shows F.F. Maverick tumble on the sandy surface and roll several times before disappearing off the track. A track veterinarian later determined F.F. Maverick “suffered a severe neck injury” that was “catastrophic and not repairable,” according to a state investigative report. The greyhound, believed to be less than 2 years old, was euthanized as a result of the racing injury, records show. “It is a particularly violent death.

There’s no doubt Maverick suffered greatly before he died,” said Carey Theil, executive director of GREY2K USA. “It’s a terrible case. But it is one of many.”

Theil’s organization, which is pushing to end dog racing, has been compiling information about greyhound deaths since Florida lawmakers began requiring race tracks to report fatalities on their property more than three years ago.

Since May 2013, at least 360 greyhounds have died at Florida tracks, state reports compiled by GREY2K indicate, an average of one death every three or four days. At least 52 of those were reported at the Daytona Beach Kennel Club, where F.F. Maverick suffered the fatal injury. Only one other Florida track, Derby Lane in St. Petersburg, reported more deaths with 54. “That is absolutely unacceptable,” said Theil. “It’s something the track should be held to account for, and it’s something the local community should be very concerned about.” 

For more information on the dangers of gambling, please visit CASINO WATCH & CASINO WATCH FOUNDATION

Advertisements

Comments are disabled.

%d bloggers like this: