New Studies Point to Connection between Loot Box Spending and Problem Gambling

Casino Watch Focus has reported on the newest gambling mechanic that has taken over video games aimed at children. Loot Boxes are a gambling reward system where the player pays to acquire mystery boxes that when opened provide random in-game items. These items can be simply cosmetic items like a new outfit for a character like Luke Skywalker to wear in Battle Front II, the Star Wars Game based on the Disney property that EA game developed that brought this issue to the forefront, to actually in game weapons that make you more powerful and thus able to win more. Many have called this mechanic out as simple gambling directed and children and the amount of money people spend on loot boxes chasing a certain item is staggering. Many world leaders and government agencies have either banned their use or have called for studies to enact legislation to properly regulate them. Now two large studies have come forward that provides proof that this mechanic plays on the same psychological principles that turn people into problem gamblers as well. An online source reports: 

Many popular games allow people to pay a small fee to obtain a “loot box” containing random selections of virtual in-game items. New research has found that there is a significant relationship between problematic gambling behaviors and spending money on loot boxes.

The findings, which appear in the journal PLOS One, indicate that people who spend more money on loot boxes are also more likely to be unable to keep their gambling habits in check.

“Loot boxes are extremely widespread. A recent analysis we did showed that they may feature in as many as 63% of mobile games. They’re extremely profitable, too: They’re estimated to have perhaps generated as much as $30 billion in revenue in 2018,” said study author David Zendle of York St. John University.

The societal impact of such finding is troubling to say the least. Various game publishers have made some changes to their loot box systems so that you can’t “cash out” or sell your items for real money, thus avoiding the technical definition of gambling in some jurisdictions. Still, others see the entire mechanic as so psychologically manipulative, that regulation is absolutely necessary, especially when so many games are geared towards children. The article goes on to outline the impact:

The participants all reported regularly playing at least of one of ten popular games that feature loot boxes: Player Unknown’s Battlegrounds, League of Legends, Hearthstone, Overwatch, Counter-Strike: GO, FIFA 18, Rocket League, DOTA 2, Team Fortress 2, and Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege.

“There is a link between loot box spending and problem gambling. However, we’re not sure if this means that loot boxes literally cause problem gambling, or if it means that people who are already problem gamblers spend significantly more money on loot boxes. In either case, though, it doesn’t look socially beneficial.”

Some researchers have compared loot boxes to a predatory form of psychological ‘entrapment’ where players spend an escalating amount of money because they believe they have invested too much to quit. But longitudinal research is needed to determine whether loot boxes are directly related to the development of gambling problems.

“Researchers have suggested that loot boxes might create a gateway to problem gambling. We still don’t know if this is true,” Zendle remarked. The study, “Loot boxes are again linked to problem gambling: Results of a replication study,
was authored by David Zendle and Paul Cairns. 

For more information on the dangers of gambling, please visit CASINO WATCH & CASINO WATCH FOUNDATION

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